Internal Content

A short introduction to the CS Track Analytics Workbench

How can we make the CS Track database of Citizen Science projects interactively accessible for the purposes of interest-driven retrieval, navigation and comparative analysis as well as for checking and correcting existing information items and adding new ones? To achieve this, we have developed the Analytics Workbench.

Data donation and Citizen Science  – an interview with Elissa Redmiles, Max Planck Institute for Software Systems

Data donation and Citizen Science  – an interview with Elissa Redmiles, Max Planck Institute for Software Systems

Dr. Elissa M. Redmiles is a faculty member and research group leader of the Safety & Society group at the Max Planck Institute for Software Systems. She has additionally served as a consultant and researcher at multiple institutions, including Microsoft Research, Facebook, the World Bank, the Center for Democracy and Technology, and the University of Zurich.

More information on replicable models – just one of the priorities for CS Track stakeholders

More information on replicable models – just one of the priorities for CS Track stakeholders

In order to better tailor our work to the needs of our different stakeholders, the CS Track team led a series of focus group discussions in September. These focus groups directly involved over 30 people coming from different stakeholder communities including policy-makers and officers, platform and support agency representatives, people interested in CS from an educational perspective and CS project leaders, participants and researchers.

IMDEA Energy. Communicating science to drive citizen engagement in the transition to a Circular Economy model

IMDEA Energy. Communicating science to drive citizen engagement in the transition to a Circular Economy model

IMDEA Energy is a research center created by the Community of Madrid in Spain, whose objectives are to promote and carry out R&D activities related to energy, especially for the promotion of renewable energies and clean energy technologies that allow progress towards a sustainable energy system. 

How do citizen science activities develop and work? Computational analysis techniques can help us find out

How do citizen science activities develop and work? Computational analysis techniques can help us find out

A cornerstone of the CS Track project’s approach to investigating how citizen science (CS) activities develop and work is the use of computational analysis techniques applied to digital sources and traces to characterise and analyse these activities in terms of interactions within certain projects, the interplay with “official” science and their interaction with society.

Who takes part in Citizen Science projects & why?

Who takes part in Citizen Science projects & why?

Identifying who takes part in citizen science projects and understanding what motivates them are key aspects in building our understanding of citizen science. These aspects are at the heart of a recent White Paper published by the CS Track project which highlights interest in the theme, contributing to scientific research and opportunities to learn as key factors when it comes to motivation.

Characteristics and nature of Citizen Science in Europe today

Characteristics and nature of Citizen Science in Europe today

Citizen Science is changing and evolving as highlighted in the recent CS Track White Paper on Themes, Objectives and Participants. This white paper draws on the initial results of a large scale CS Track survey carried out in early 2021 which highlights an increasing use of technology, diversification in terms of themes and a re-assessment of the value that citizen science can bring to the individual as well as society as a whole.

Characterising engagement in citizen science

Characterising engagement in citizen science

Engaging a wide range of participants over time, is key to the successful operation of citizen science projects. But how can projects accomplish this? The short and perhaps simplistic answer is “know your audience” – The whole range of potential audiences your project may have.

Economic considerations in Citizen Science

Economic considerations in Citizen Science

Examining the role of economic considerations in Citizen Science projects may yield some surprising conclusions, for example that those considerations may not be deemed by those involved in a project as important as could be expected. Greater attention seems to be paid to non-economic factors (e.g., educational gains).

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We ask for your profile for research purposes only. Filling in your profile does not imply to filtering the content you will receive.

I do not know which is my profile
  1. Policy-maker: Regional, national or international policy-maker or influencer.
  2. Academic: Academic engaged in research related to Citizen Science.
  3. Citizen Scientist: Citizen Scientist involved in or managing/planning one or more Citizen Science project.
  4. Organisational representative: member of a civil society organisation or NGO supporting Citizen Science (including science centres and musea, CS clubs and platforms etc.).
  5. Company representative: company employee supporting and/or funding Citizen Science projects or activities.
  6. Educator: Educator interested in supporting and promoting Citizen Science in an educational setting.
  7. Other.